2016 Honda CR-V vs 2016 Toyota RAV4
2016 Honda CR-V 2016 Toyota RAV4

185 horsepower 2.4L four-cylinder

Engine 176 horsepower 2.5L four-cylinder
29 MPG, 27 with AWD* Combined Gas Mileage [1] 26 MPG, 25 with AWD
Standard on CR-V EX and up Blind Spot Camera Optional on RAV4 Limited
5 Passenger Capacity 5

2016 Honda CR-V vs 2016 Toyota RAV4

2016 Honda CR-V vs 2016 Toyota RAV4 paint colors

Tom Brady vs Peyton Manning. Biggie vs Tupac. Godzilla vs King Kong. Like these other famous rivalries, the Honda CR-V and the Toyota RAV4 have been duking it out for years. Like those other rivalries, you’ll find lots of fanatically strong support for both sides, depending on who you talk to. So let’s be real: we’re not going to pretend we’re 100%, totally, completely objective and unbiased here. With that said, both the 2016 RAV4 and the 2016 CR-V have lots of strong points. They’re two of the most spacious 5-row SUVs you can buy, and they’re both extremely versatile, with tons of available features. If you’re considering the 2016 Honda CR-V vs 2016 Toyota RAV4, you probably know that already. So, let’s get into the specifics. While they’re both solid options, here are a few of the areas where this year’s new CR-V really does come out ahead of its greatest rival.

Both the 2016 CR-V and the 2016 RAV4 use a single engine across all of their trim levels. (The 2016 RAV4 does come in a hybrid version, but that’s its own separate thing. For the purposes of this comparison, we’re only going to be talking about the gasoline models.) Without a second, heavier-duty upgrade available, the performance of that base engine becomes an even more important consideration. The CR-V’s engine will give you 185 horsepower, compared to the RAV-4’s 176. While that difference may seem small, the CR-V’s engine also comes out ahead on fuel efficiency. It gets up to 29 combined miles per gallon, while the RAV4 manages 26 at best. [1]

Space, Efficiency and Options

They’re pretty evenly matched when it comes to space: both SUVs have lots of it. The RAV4’s cargo space behind the 2nd row is slightly bigger, but the corresponding passenger legroom is slightly smaller. With the seats folded down, cargo space is about equal. On that front, the CR-V also features incredibly convenient easy-to-fold backseats, which fold themselves flat with just one pull of one strap on each side. The RAV4’s folding setup requires a bit more work.

Finally, the CR-V makes some of its convenient tech features more widely available across the lineup than the RAV4 does. While a rearview backup camera is standard on every RAV4 and every CR-V, a blind spot camera isn’t. With the CR-V, it’s still very widely available, as a standard feature on the mid-level EX trim and up. With the RAV4, on the other hand, it’s only available on the most expensive Limited edition, and even then, it’s part of an option package that costs extra.

[1] Based on 2016 EPA mileage ratings. Use for comparison purposes only. Your mileage will vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle.

2016 Honda CR-V vs 2016 Toyota RAV4 dashboard

*Based on 2016 EPA mileage ratings. Use for comparison purposes only. Your mileage will vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle, driving conditions and other factors.